Authorities Nab Suspected Amazon.com DDOS Attacker

(Ping! Zine Web Tech Magazine) – Participate in a high-profile cyber-attack and you’ll be caught eventually. That’s the lesson one Russian citizen learned after U.S. authorities worked to arrest him on counts of hitting retail site Amazon.com with a DDoS attack back in 2008.

Dmitry Olegovich Zubakha’s actions allegedly brought down the website for a number of hours, thus blocking customer transactions, a costly obstacle for any online retail presence. Authorities ranging from the U.S. Secret Service to the Seattle Police Department participated in the investigation.

The attacker’s tactics also allowed Zubakha and an unnamed co-conspirator to allegedly steal 28 thousand credit cards. Other sites targeted by the now 25-year old included eBay and Priceline.

“These cyber bandits do serious harm to our businesses and their customers.  But the old adage is true: the arm of the law is long,” commented U.S. Attorney Jenny A. Durkan in a press release regarding the matter.

“This defendant could not hide in cyberspace, and I congratulate the international law enforcement agencies who tracked him down and made this arrest,” Durkan continued.

Zubakha even went so far as to acknowledge he was the source of the attack via a Russian forum. At another point, the unnamed co-conspirator offered their services to Princeline.com to stop the DDoS attack they’d started.

Security firm Sophos reported on the matter, displaying a 2008 image from Amazon.com including a statement the company made during the downtime. “We are currently investigating an issue that has impacted the availability of the Amazon.com website. As a part of this resolution, some customers may experience error messages that indicate that their access to the Amazon web site has been blocked for various reasons,” portion of the text read.

DDoS attacks have been a critical tactic used by hackers to cause significant downtime to web presences. They commonly rely on infected systems, overwhelming websites with large amounts of traffic.

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