ICANN Looks for Help Concerning gTLDs

(Ping! Zine Web Hosting Magazine) – Want your own customized gTLD instead of going with a common one like .com, .org, or .net? Well, it could cost you.

Internet authority ICANN is currently moving its way through the application initiative where interested parties can apply to create gTLDs using whatever they’d like for a $185 thousand dollar application fee.

However, there is a significantly smaller price if the application pertains to someone who can’t afford such a staggering cost (primarily aimed at those in developing countries). Although still high, that price is set at $47 thousand.

And on Wednesday, ICANN announced it was looking for volunteers to help with the discounted part of the application process.

In a press release on the matter, ICANN said that the volunteer selections will be based off of both experience and backgrounds in areas such as business plan analysis, domain registry management, developing economies, small business operations and more.

“These volunteers will be key to ICANN’s effort to assure that the less-developed parts of the world are able to participate in the new Domain name program,” stated ICANN Senior VP Kurt Pritz in a press release.

Pritz continued, “The panel members will make a real impact in ensuring that the opportunities for innovation and economic development created by the Internet are open to everyone.”

ICANN initially approved the application process for customized gTLDs in June. Last month, the Internet authority said that the process was moving along “without a hitch,” with ICANN CEO Rod Beckstrom stating, “I can state firmly that one week into the process, the application system for the new domain names is functioning just as it should.” Meanwhile, the initiative is expected to go on on until April. ICANN will then reveal details of which gTLDs were applied for in May.

Current ICANN President Rod Beckstrom will step down from his position following the completion of his term in July. The Internet authority is now considering who will become Beckstrom’s successor.

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