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The Adaptive Technology Serving Billions of Unique Customer Demands

By Martin Laesch, Chief Technology Officer, Neural Technologies

As our digital ecosystem becomes increasingly connected, enterprises face unprecedented levels of unique customer service demands. To do more than just survive in today’s business environment, organizations need adaptability, innovation, and flexibility. To thrive, enterprises must maximize their ability to charge for personalized services, which end users now expect and demand in our ever-connected world.

The rise of personalized demands

As customer service providers move to 5G, more Internet of Things (IoT) applications and connected markets are creating new experiences and new potential services. Consumers are at the center of this drive, as they expect to contribute to and dictate a unique, customized experience with many digital experiences at their fingertips. From connected smart homes to wearable technologies, the more personalized the experience is, the more value it brings to the consumer’s life.

The majority of consumers said they would be willing to pay more for a customized product or service, according to research by Deloitte. In addition, businesses that do not create personalized experiences risk losing revenue and customer loyalty. However, it is not easy to make sure that each customer has a unique experience while still making a profit.

In such a competitive landscape, each opportunity to meet a unique service demand needs to be recognized as an opportunity to explore a new potential revenue stream. With personalized services dictating customer loyalty, providing such services is becoming more of a necessity for sustainable business growth, as opposed to an option. With so many personalized and individual needs to be met, an automated approach to charging for services is the only feasible way to charge customers accurately.

Nothing is too complex

As enterprises rise to the challenge of managing the complexity of services and accurately charging for them, they will turn to a flexible, automated solution that will successfully support the progression of its business model. Within this, they will need to adapt and create new tariff structures for unique services.

An automated, flexible, multi-levelled tariff ecosystem is being used by leading telecom operators to enhance customer experience and attract loyal customers. This approach is an automated solution that uses deep analytics to identify and charge customers for the unique services they require. The use of dynamic technology can support the growth of business models through its power to innovate new services using data intelligence at the time when a customer needs it the most. Fundamentally, using a charging solution can help measure what customers want and position processes and resources to deliver.

Harnessing data intelligence

The learning process is key within this relationship between the personalized service and the customer. It needs to be right, and getting it right is different every time. The use of sophisticated Machine Learning (ML) technologies is the difference between making the right business move and making the wrong business move. By using data intelligence and deep analytics, enterprises can make more informed business decisions based on what the customer wants, and which services are needed.

Following years of delivering ML solutions to enterprises and telecommunications service providers around the world, Neural Technologies has witnessed first-hand the power of digital transformation solutions to support the growth of business models and revenue streams. The use of data is available to every enterprise. With the support of a leading ML solution, it can harness this data and automate effective and profitable charging processes.

Avoiding revenue leakage

While a flexible charging solution helps identify new services to charge customers for, it also helps capture services that are not being charged for. Using data intelligence, the technology can capture and report discrepancies and prevent customers from being over-charged or under-charged. Amid a constantly evolving tariff system, a flexible service charging model is necessary for retaining loyal customers. With the use of automation, a flexible charging system can also help enterprises meet customer service demands in “real time” and maximize profitability from these transactions.

As a complete cloud-based charging, analytics, and revenue assurance platform, CaaS has the ability to adopt a wide variety of tariff structures at any level of complexity. This includes all charging deployments, from peak hours, to discounts, to geo-zoning, ensuring that all scenarios of customer usage and billing are covered. Being a multi-levelled tariff ecosystem, CaaS can support use cases such as Utility Metering, IoT Rating, Revenue Assurance, and Billing Reconciliation.

The solution provides both maximum flexibility and profitability to improve customer experience and enhance profits, while future-proofing the network and leaving room for inevitable structural evolution. Offering effective solutions to facilitate operations in every aspect of customer charging, it works to develop innovations that not only serve the purpose of optimizing current network efficiency, but also support continual growth, both corporately and technologically.

To help combat the challenges faced within the industry, CSPs are increasingly harnessing revenue assurance capabilities to guarantee an accurate and safe revenue stream with no leakages. With built-in platform security, this type of solution also offers cutting-edge data quality, ensuring an accurate and secure means of transformation, while maintaining ROI and enhancing customer experience.

Bio

Martin Laesch joined Neural Technologies in October 2015 as Senior Vice President of Professional Services and is now the Chief Technology Officer. Martin is responsible for the global Strategy and Products, Solutions development as well as the Consultancy Services to customers. Martin has more than 20 years’ experience in telecommunications services and the software industry, filling roles from Project Manager to Managing Director. Martin joined Neural Technologies in October 2015 by acquisition of Enterest GmbH, which he co-founded in 2003. Martin holds a Master of Computer Science degree.

IoT’s Impact on the Data Center and the Role of Intelligent Power

By Marc Cram, Director of New Market Development, Server Technology

Once dubbed the next Industrial Revolution, the Internet of Things (IoT) has proven to be the movement that will drive the evolution of network, IT, and data center design into the future. To sum up the net impact of all of the new devices situated at the edge of all of the networks, consider this: there will be some 24 billion Internet of Things devices online by the end of 2020, which is actually more than double the 10 billion devices that will be used directly by people. Intelligent PDUs will play a critical role in the management of networks that support that traffic.

In fact, IoT has had a number of impacts on data center infrastructure, as well as data center services. Not only has IoT driven the creation of more robust networks and IT systems, it has also pushed the boundaries of what was previously understood as cloud and edge computing, and the networks that support those systems.

Lean and mean

When we look at the impact of IoT on data center infrastructure, the greatest tangible effect has been on data center networks. Most facilities have had to adapt in order to keep up with IoT—especially 5G IoT. This has meant an increase in the number of connections and in the overall speed of networks in most deployments, even ones that lean heavily on edge computing. Those edge devices still need to push data back to a central hub for more detailed computing and analysis.

Because of this, the majority of data centers are upping their networking and connectivity game. Another key impact IoT brings to data centers is a different type of capacity demand. IoT devices are continually running and delivering data, meaning that many data centers now have a much smaller window than before to take a network offline or make adjustments. Traditional maintenance windows are now closed, and network architectures have to be adapted to support uptime. The impact on data center infrastructure? It needs to be equally flexible.

More secure

An unexpected impact of IoT on data centers has been the need for an increased security presence at the edge. This new security challenge is the unwanted passenger on the train of network safety. It is the result of having more passengers on the new IoT touchpoints and endpoints.

This increase in the number of devices has presented a unique challenge for those in charge of their company’s networks. The proliferation of traffic has meant that companies are investing in new tools to monitor and manage traffic on their networks. While these tools are mostly in the form of software and IT appliances, there has also been an increase in the adoption of network PDUs.

Everything needs power

While they may seem like an unlikely player in new IoT data center infrastructures, intelligent PDUs are serving a key role in securing networks, supporting uptime, monitoring traffic, and managing systems.

Switched PDUs are the gatekeepers of all the power that is fed to the rack. After all, everything needs power, right? Not only is the rack PDU the bridge between the data center’s entire electrical infrastructure and the devices that run the network, it also provides the nearest touchpoint to monitor and manage that power. Talk about up close and personal!

Monitoring the edge

IoT computing demands more sophisticated monitoring solutions at the rack and PDU level. By definition, edge compute sites are not adjacent to the core data center facility. Lack of proximity means that there is an increased reliance on the ability to monitor power and cooling conditions remotely, as well as the ability to remotely control and reboot single outlets. As IoT has pushed monitoring to the distant reaches of the network, intelligent PDUs have likewise been deployed to provide feedback and control.

Monitoring the core

Intelligent PDUs arguably play a more critical role at the core, thanks to IoT. They provide information about equipment operation by metering the input and output power at the PDU. They also provide remote control operations that allow you to turn power on and off to individual receptacles. Having a network connection allows the data center manager to enable or disable outlets from a remote location or within the facility itself. As IoT has required more flexibility and fewer maintenance windows, intelligent PDUs have stepped in to assist with controlling the computing environment.

Monitoring to manage

Increased data traffic and shifting workloads increase the complexity of the data center manager’s power and cooling resources within the facility. By using intelligent PDUs, you can access real-time usage data and environmental alerts. All power usage data is easily tracked, stored, and exported into reports using intelligent PDUs and DCIM software. By analyzing accurate power usage information at the cabinet level, data center managers are now able to more accurately shift power resources within the white space.

In short, an intelligent PDU can be the control your data center infrastructure needs to support IoT applications. This is increasingly important as this infrastructure is being pushed closer to the edge with even less time for maintenance. Higher device demand comes with higher power demands, which means more challenges to the network. PDUs help you meet them and anticipate the next IoT evolution.

Marc Cram is Director of New Market Development for Server Technology, a brand of Legrand (@Legrand). A technology evangelist, he is driven by a passion to deliver a positive power experience for the data center owner/operator. He earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Rice University and has more than 30 years of experience in the field of electronics. Follow him on LinkedIn or @ServerTechInc on Twitter.

Customizable Cloud-Computing Ensures Successful Commercial Drone Missions

By Barry Alexander, Founder and CEO, Aquiline Drones

Although awareness of and appreciation for commercial drone systems is growing, many businesses remain unaware of the opportunities drones offer to achieve better business results, help streamline business solutions, and elevate profitability. Drones are unique aerial vehicles and are ideal for providing crucial aerial perspectives to assess emergency situations like the recent Australian wildfires, and for delivering critical medical supplies to those in need. Drones are even being used to deliver information to the public, as in the current coronavirus pandemic.

However, most businesses do not realize the intrinsic benefit of integrating drones into their day-to-day operations, whether it be for asset inspection and management, perimeter security, precision farming, aerial ranching, video production, or surveying and mapping. The list continues! But a point of note is this: A drone is just mechanical hardware unless used optimally to gather information. Such reconnaissance activity allows users to capture, analyze, manage, model, and share data insights – usually in real-time. This level of application calls for a robust computing platform that supports complex drone operations and the footage they generate. This is facilitated with cloud computing technology.

According to a recent survey by RedLock, only 7% of businesses firmly believe they have decent visibility over all important company information from drone usage in a well-structured and well-secured enterprise cloud. To address their inadequacies, companies are now seeking out unique, customizable, technical platforms such as the AD Cloud. These platforms offer everything involved in completing commercial drone operations in one centralized setting. The AD Cloud in particular provides a variety of salient features ideal for building highly customizable and large-scale solutions.

Building a Cloud from the Ground Up

Core features and services offered by some of the nation’s most notable cloud companies that have mastered and integrated artificial intelligence (AI) and the Internet-of-Things (IoT) include:

  • Modularity – Scalability for high-density drone operations across industries requires a modular cloud design, in which services can be added a la carte, allowing businesses to start small, then scale up as needed.
  • Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Specific – It is important for cloud environments to cater to the industries for which they are being used. Specialized cloud platforms such as the AD Cloud provide algorithms for UAV operations, manufacturing, and maintenance, making the AD Cloud more valuable and more desirable for businesses that want to integrate UAVs into their operations.
  • Aviation Compliance – Drones are aircraft. Accordingly, they must operate and should be held to the same or similar standards as manned aircraft. These standards should be established and regulated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) or the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). A drone-specific cloud should maintain built-in compliance rules to ensure that connected devices remain safe and compliant with regulations and the law.
  • True Autonomy – Allows for autonomous UAV operations with plug-and-play mission capabilities.
  • Data Insights – Specialized algorithms can be created for flight control, traffic management, enhanced awareness, terrain modeling, and image recognition, along with specific additions for more sophisticated scenarios.
  • Full Lifecycle Governance – This includes providing connectivity and insights across the drone lifecycle – from product development, to manufacturing, to UAV operations and MRO – resulting in greater efficiencies and reduced downtime.
  • Dynamic Dashboard – A full-capability digital dashboard accessible on any device delivers a comprehensive, standardized, and flexible user experience (UX) with the power of the cloud at one’s fingertips. Users can plan, collaborate, and execute missions, livestream data and video, and obtain real-time data insights – all from within a single and customizable enterprise asset management (EAM) system.

Further, a comprehensive cloud system such as AD Cloud can also aggregate data, which enables companies to make statistical forecasts and logical inferences for future resource planning and allocations.

A Bright and Lofty Future

Despite its extreme growth within the past decade, the global cloud computing market is forecast to exceed $623 billion by 2023 as 80% of organizations – many using drone technology – migrate to the cloud by 2025.

One key projection is that cloud computing will change the hardware architecture of drones by simplifying these flying robots. With low latency, higher bandwidth, and a highly reliable connection to the cloud, a drone only needs to carry sensors, without requiring any additional power.

Drones and edge computing technology will continue to grow exponentially, allowing for more resolution, more sensor types, and more flight capabilities, while supporting demand for higher frequency and more data. In fact, drone fleets and swarms will have the ability to launch from edge computing hubs to further automate the process.

Another major highlight will be the quick creation and activation of a comprehensive cloud computing-drone infrastructure as directed and overseen by the FAA, the regulatory agency for all UAVs – ensuring safety remains paramount.

Lastly, the recent introduction of a bipartisan bill in Congress entitled, The American Security Drone Act of 2019 essentially bans the use of foreign drones – mainly Chinese drones – and other unmanned aerial systems that have been purchased with federal dollars.

The drone industry continues to gain in purpose and popularity, empowering companies that use them with powerful, customized cloud computing capabilities. Cloud-enabled drone technology increases these companies’ operating efficiency, efficacy, safety, and ultimately, their bottom line. As more of these cloud computer-connected devices take to the sky, we’ll see a world that is truly interconnected within the technological atmosphere.

Bio

A veteran pilot, serial entrepreneur, and visionary leader, Barry Alexander is founder and CEO of Aquiline Drones, a full-service, US-based commercial drone company that boasts an integrated manufacturing and supply chain, world-class MRO services, and real-time data insights to improve ROI across a variety of industries. Barry’s ultimate goal is to revolutionize the entire American drone market through innovative technology and key community and governmental partnerships to create a world in which humans and drones live and operate in harmony for the betterment of society.